Scales


#1

Is it possible to get the a4 to lock to a scale like pentatonic?


Programing Scales
#2

In note setup menu you can choose Major or minor & root note.
Hoping they add some more esoteric scales with future updates.


#3

that would be awesome :slight_smile:


#4

i think i may be doing something wrong. for instance, the scales only come into effect when the arpegiator is on an if you want to edit the step value of the arpegiator. also for transposing a track. is this correct, or can you just for instance change the scales setting to minor and all the notes on the mini keyboard will play notes within the minor scale? (which i would love!!)

cheers

conor


#5

+1


#6

Are scales still not a possibility on the a4? Apart from min and major, I mean.


#7

Didn’t hear about new scales.
How do you want to use scales? Arp ?
Multi Map wouldn’t help you to make a specific scale ?


#8

Isn’t multi map for playing with an external keyboard? I just want to set a scale and whatever key I press, even if it’s outside that scale, it’ll stay within the scale. Not much of a keyboard player, and I love using quantizers for this type of stuff in my eurorack. Musicality and a quicker workflow. :slight_smile:


#9

You play notes live with AK, or A4 ?

Multi Map can do much more. You can assign any sound with any note (and set a scale), assign transposed patterns playing directly or sync, assign notes for external midi gear.

With 2 tracks, arp with plocked notes you can set an 8 notes scale. Just place trigs to play notes.


#10

Ok, cool, thanks! I’ll check it out. :slight_smile:


#11

Ak or A4 ?
Transpose is different with mini keys Multi Map mode, but you can use them to record.

Check @cuckoomusic Multi Map Tutorial.


#12

haarm


#13

Cheers! It’s the analog four. I’m getting one in a couple of days. :slight_smile:


#14

It would be so amazing if the A4 would let you define a user scale by allowing adjustments in cents for each note, for proper non-Western intonation.

I’d definitely cave in and get one.


#15

The common major scale actually has seven modes which translate into other scales in other keys.
The major scale in one key is actually 6 other scales if played with a different root note.
The notes used are the same notes, but give a different musical relation depending on what root key they are played over.
G major consists of the same notes as E minor for example, they sound happy when played over a G, but sad when played over an E. The other modes have different favors, G major notes played over a D note is D mixolydian and has sort of an “epic” flavor…

For example, the G major(Ionian) scale consists of the exact same notes as:
A Dorian
B Phrygian
C Lydian
D Mixolydian
E Aolian
F# Locrian

So by setting the arp to G major you get G major, assuming the root of the key your playing is actually G.
With the same G major setting, playing in a root note of A will give you the Dorian mode(scale), playing with a root note of D would give you the Mixolydian mode(scale), etc…

So any of the seven modes can be used not by selecting the scale, but rather changing the root key of the arp setting, while playing in a different root key…

Hope this makes sense, at some point maybe I’ll find or make a chart…
This goes for OT too…
:grinning:

Edit: Link to chart: Scales


Scales update?
#16

Awesome summing up @Open_Mike, I’d never explored changing root notes before… will definitely look into that now!


#17

Eventually I’ll make a chart or something, only 7 out of the 12 possible root notes will end up conforming to a mode in a certain key, you have to know which ones.
The G major example will work for the other keys/scales I listed…


#18

Have used various modes quite a bit in the past, this will make working with (my favourites) Dorian and Mixolydian easier


#19

My favs as well!


#20

Yeah, throws in a more exotic sound/vibe, kind of unsettling/suspenseful without being atonal. It doesn’t always work out, but can help avoid obvious musical tropes…