Sampling books?

Are there any good books on the Art of Sampling. I say art as i think its a skill that can be learnt but you still need talent to know how to craft a piece of music. Im not talking about books from any particular hardware. Just the Art of Sampling in general.

Ps, Do people sample unknown old artists to avoid copyright or the likelihood of a a small sample being recognized? Just wondering.

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Following. Great question.

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There is no book, you just have to do it.
Check how producers that inspire you do it.
Who musically turns you on?
In this day and age, there are tons of tutorials, guides, lessons, tips etc. out there.
Micro-Chop and Very Sick Beats are good sources for how to flip samples.
Get to it. All the beats.

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https://www.amazon.co.uk/Field-Art-Recording/dp/0956855962 the only thing i know related is this book. But it is in the art of capturing your own samples from the enviroments we inhabit.

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Simon Cann: “ “How to Make a Noise: Sample-Based Synthesis”

I have it, but have not studied it yet.

Yes theres very litte out there in the literature form. I guess its too wide a subject to put into one framework. I can see why people buy old records though for sampling from. Now when does the SP2400 arrive i preordered. I missed the boat many years ago but now getting back into it hardware wise. Anyone else?

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Watching this as well.
Originally I figured making “lofi sample mixes” would be a good first step in electronic music and that the Digitakt would be a good easy fit. Deceivingly complex music form it is… I also picked up a 1010 Blackbox because it’s small and would be easy to keep on hand when I have some free time to kill. Listening to the pre-loaded kits is interesting as they have assembled some sounds that “work” without much fuss. Tells me selecting and prepping the samples are a bit deeper than it looks. Not much on the Youtubes other than loads of guys with SP-404s jamming away.

The internet is the best resource for sampling by a wide wide margin, it’s cause sampling is kinda punk, take something and make it yours. No rules. Way back to the old heads to the new kids ripping YouTube. These dudes aren’t writing books. I’m sure there’s probably a few books here and there about it but your most invaluable source of information regarding sampling is in these forums, mpc forums, general forums, reddit. You’ll find a lot more information this way

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Try old magazines from the 80’s~90’s
I read a few back in the early 90’s (I owned a Mirage :slightly_smiling_face: )
You could put together a compilation of articles?

https://www.muzines.co.uk/articles/a-vocal-chord/2259

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I would say the best form of study is in practice and that sampling at its best is very organic and is just a matter of listening and being present.

I’ve been making beats since my early teens with my roots being in making stuff with dilla, 9th wonder, and premier in mind and now sampling is at the root of everything I do.

With the advance of technology, stuff like even granular samplers you can literally take seconds and even less of sample material and stretch it into a drone.

Even as I get older I find myself on the floor at record shops going through the dollar and sale crates and I feel like it doesn’t necessarily matter to hide sample sources. but typically I chop em up or filter and distort them enough that it sounds that it doesn’t sound much like the original all though I’m all for simple loops that are easily recognized and have plenty of beats like this too. There’s plenty of producers exploring that and I see it as a form of minimalism and beautiful really. Sometimes without even layering any additional drums.

I have no worries of being sued and maybe I should but I feel like that’s how the art form started. I guess from a sort of punk ethos. I’d imagine if I’m able to get sued I’d have enough money or support to handle it lol. I figure if the song is that big you should’ve made some money off it if they’re looking for money.

But yeah this rant aside, I think the art of sampling lies in tastes, a sort of meditation while listening and an open ear. I’ve sampled from movies, conversations, walks through the city, records, radio, tapes, my own beats and sketches. Literally anything and everything.

The only thing i won’t sample from nowadays is from YouTube (too many cat’s pull from the same channels) and streaming services because it just feels a little taboo. I think one of the best parts is just digging and finding what the universe throws at you :slight_smile:

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Read books on synthesis and instead of oscillator in signal path it is your sample. That will help you along the way. Just like learning synthesis and mixing you need to put hours into your assignments. Once you get the fundamentals down it carries across software and hardware.

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I also think it’s crazy how the whole lofi scene got so cheese and commercialized with these playlists and shit lol.

It’s very easy to sound like other cats when you chopping the same samples using the same bpm’s and drums. So like idk man the whole shit I think is like really rooted in og hip hop shit where originality reigned supreme. from the way u dressed the way u talked and ya flows and beats and all that.

YouTube tutorials for gear and like how to chop samples to me personally is mostly cheese: there’s no rules to the shit really you just gotta go loop shit up

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x1000, it’s an art. By the way the secret to YouTube sampling is sorting by recently uploaded. There are millions of channels with 0 followers uploading all ranges of vocals, instruments and vinyl rips around the clock. Plus this,

I’d be honoured if someone listened to my beats that intently and bothered to track down the original sample, they can’t take what I don’t have

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Whosampled.com lowkey the feds tbh it’s mad disrespectful but I never even remember what I sample really so to think ppl can find em it when I can’t even find em is crazy lol.

But yeah I’ve seen some really lowkey songs pop up on whosampled and it trips me out.

This one lady was telling me who she knew a friend who worked for some streaming service that knew of like some software that can read waveforms and catch samples. And it kinda makes sense sometimes when cats upload leaked songs on YouTube and SoundCloud they get taken down with the swiftness and I feel like this is some cat paid by a label or whoever to track down leaked songs lol.

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https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/lost-art-sampling-part-1

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Definitely not a book, but the rhythm roulette thing is my go to when I want to get inspired :slight_smile:

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Yeah for real I have no idea how it picks out warped samples though cause on a visual level it’s a completely different waveform. Especially plus drums and other elements etc.

Still the way to be! real heads know what’s up. In some larger sense it still goes like this, it’s just been abstracted beyond even being hip hop and then evolved again past that. Can’t even imagine where it’s going

It’s funny you mention that because one time I made a demo that used a Paul Nice drum loop from one of the drum library records I used. Not only did I low pass filter it and sample at 22khz on the EPS SoundCloud immediately killed the link and notified me of the break and drum library it’s from. Well duh ! I think if you paid for the drum record and used to make a different song then you are free to create. I guess not.

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did you chop up the drums & create your own rhythm? Just curious… it would be crazy if they found it & it was a different rhythm.

Loop they caught instantly.

Then I decided to be a scientist and chop. Then I replayed the break with the piano hits that was part of the original sample. So the end result is a whole new loop where kicks and snares and the piano have a different order but still got detected by the sample police. I wonder if I added another element like a vocal hit where it would ignore everything else.

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