How do the different Trig Types work?

hello,

I’m new to the OT and although I read the Manual and the “Some thoughts on Elektron’s OT” from Merlin I still don’t understand how the different trig types work or even how I can activate them. I understand how the sample trigs and one shot trigs for the recorders work, but

  • what the hell are trigless locks and trigless trigs?

  • I know it’s possible to set one shot trigs for samples but I can’t find out how…

  • I’m still wondering if its possible to delete all changed parameters of a track. After changing parameters of a track and changing the sample i want to return to the standard parameters

this is a first loop I made with the OT

https://soundcloud.com/schahudi/wahnkalkul

THX

Trigless locks and trigless trigs are variations on the same concept - a trig just does a couple of things a lock doesn’t.

So every lit note on the sequencer is a trig, which can be a bit confusing at first. Regular trigs, as the name suggests, trigger samples. If you’ve made a loop, you already know this. Press a button and it tells the OT to play the sample at that point in the sequence.

But sometimes you want to enter some info to the sequence that doesn’t trigger the sample. Say you have a 1 bar drum loop and you’d like to add reverb to the drums on steps 5 and 13. So you want to add trigs to steps 5 and 13 to alter the reverb send, but a regular trig is going to start your sample playing again, and you don’t want that. This is a job for a trigless lock (or perhaps an LFO, but let’s stay focused).

So instead of pressing the trig buttons on their own, you hold Function and press them. Bam! They turn a dim green. Now hold the trigs down and set the reverb send - job done. That’s a parameter lock, or p-lock. You can also lock other parameters on the same step. When you play the sequence the sample just keeps playing as it passes these parameter locks, hence ‘trigless’.

A trigless trig (possibly the most confusingly named synth feature ever) is the same as a trigless lock except it does two other things: it triggers the LFO and it triggers FX envelopes. So if you want to retrigger an LFO without retriggering the track sample, a trigless trig is your friend. You set a trigless trig by converting an existing trigless lock (hold the trig and press Yes - it turns a brighter green). Most times, a trigless lock is all you want.

Check page 80 of the current manual for more info - that page also covers one-shot trigs. For clearing parameters, see page 87. It generally involves holding one button depending on what you want to clear (e.g. the pattern page button) and pressing Play, which you’ll notice has ‘Clear’ underneath it in red (so it’s easy to remember once you know how).

Hope that helps!

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Indeed, that solved my confusion regarding different trig types. Thx a lot

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and I always thought a trigless trig is a Winnie the Pooh character :confused:

… I prefer thinking of it as a noteless trig

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That was a very well written explanation, NickD. Thanks!

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awesome explanation !

…noteless trig FTW!

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Really helpful explanation, thank you.

So then what are the trigs that flash red and yellow?

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they have p-locks or aren’t precisely on the steps (like if you play something in without quantizing it

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Actually, I think what I meant were the unarmed recording trigs.

great explanation. I had always wondered what trigerless trigs were for

my 2nd track with the ot

https://soundcloud.com/schahudi/lndr

One shot trigs that have runned use to flash those colors to indicate that the trigs needs to be re-armed to run again. Either press yes (and no if you don’t want them re-armed again). Double press stopp usually re-arms all those trigs too.

NickD, cheers for the uber explanation. totally awesome, totally understandable.

edit: thinking more about what you said…

“A trigless trig (possibly the most confusingly named synth feature ever) is the same as a trigless lock except it does two other things: it triggers the LFO and it triggers FX envelopes. So if you want to retrigger an LFO without retriggering the track sample, a trigless trig is your friend. You set a trigless trig by converting an existing trigless lock (hold the trig and press Yes - it turns a brighter green). Most times, a trigless lock is all you want.”

i suddenly wondered … what exactly are all the cool things that the orange trigless trigs may be used for?

green trigless locks are awesome, i like using them a lot, say to achieve a p-locked (on the trigless lock) volume envelope on a loop to only allow sections of it to sound.

also do quite a bit of p-locking the green trigless locks to adjust the filter.

there must be so many other cool things that people out there are doing with the OT.

I understand more or less how to use it, it’s more easy to understand when you use it on live recording. But why not using simply a lfo?

if you want trigless locks to also trig the amp env and lfos, you can set that in the amp menu for each individual track.

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aha, there is an option for trigless locks also trigging the amp envelope? cool! i wonder what kind of cool things as in sound could be achieved with this. maybe a rhythmic pulsing of volume somehow?

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To be honest I don’t have much call for trigless trigs, but you could I guess combine them with a one-shot or half-shot LFO to get a triggerable envelope effect. Link that to the amp and you’ve got an AD env you can trigger independently from the sample (and without sacrificing an LFO).

Another good use might be retriggering an LFO that sweeps from a high to low frequency so you can activate it at arbitrary points in the sequence / sample… that could be effective if combined with a p-lock filter change. Well, I guess there are countless good uses, I just haven’t had cause to use them. Usually I stick to trigless locks, so I probably need to branch out a bit…

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I freaking screen shot this ha!

Thanks a lot very useful answer ! Now it is clear.

Well no. Both trigless trigs and trigless locks are noteless trigs but they do different things as well explained above