Bass on Model:Samples


#1

I am getting really low volume on my bass sounds on the M:S. I decided to look back at the presets.

It seems to get back your bass you will need to drive the distortion pretty hard. This will counteract the hard exponential decay. (update: decay curve is post vol+dist)

Not entirely sure why the decay is exponential. It sucks the decays I made for my samples right out. Weird choice. For all my own sampler programs I make the decay logarithmic to preserve the original’s sound quality.


#2

The envelope on the M:S is exponential, here is a sinewave being attenuated by it:

The envelope has nothing to do with the bass response, and does not get affected by driving the track volume harder, the envelope is applied post-distortion. That being said, I will look into the bass thing as well.


#3

Ahh sorry got my math mixed up! I meant the opposite response curves and will update my original post. The exponential decay is what is odd to me!

I’m not entirely sure it is bad. It definitely adds its own sound to everything. I’m totally down with it. I could see this decay response being good for better control at very high volumes.

Not obvious by my posts here, but I love this thing so far!!! Very immediately fun with a lot to dig into.


#4

Exponential decay is the most common method (for release and decay) due to how natural it sounds, and how snappy it is when dealing with percussive sound. But regarding your original sample - you’d need to match the envelope shape to whatever the original sound had, which of course is not as simple as just choosing the ‘right one’ as that will change depending on the source.

Exp was chosen because it is most common, most usable and fits the context of the device.
Logarithmic decay is probably least commonly used to be honest.

It sounds like you are mixing things up - the volume of the playback does not matter. Regarding adding its own sound - of course, it’s just a decay control. The original sound might have dynamics that are more intricate and would require an envelope with several stages to fully replicate the behavior.


#5

Another option for maintaining bass / volume integrity of samples will be to skip decay entirely and mainly use sample length for temporal adjustments. This will more accurately match the sample.

Utilizing the center space of cutoff modulation with an LFO to modulate between low and high pass filters will be really fun as well!

I am finding that the really bright harmonically rich sub waveforms I use with my electribe 2 sampler do not work very well with this filter model. I am planning to build out more complex pre-filtered sub loop samples to play around with.


#6

It sounds like you are mixing things up - the volume of the playback does not matter. Regarding adding its own sound - of course, it’s just a decay control. The original sound might have dynamics that are more intricate and would require an envelope with several stages to fully replicate the behavior.

I actually meant high SPL, not just internal high volume and how this response can possibly give more control when mixing in this environment. At that point it really depends on the sound system, though.

The exponential decay curve sounds really nice for percussive and harmonic sounds for sure. Using it on some snares I have with long reverb / noise tails has a very nice sound.

It also seems like there is some kind of windowing on the start / end of samples so that they will always end at a zero crossing! Very nice!! This means that using the sample start / length adjustments work perfectly for temporal length changes without adjusting decay. Sounds so good!


#7

make sure your audio is turned up there’s 3 different ways actually four to check Audio global Velocity vol/dist and orange volume knob lol


#8

and decay or maybe sample is no good? it def has low end


#9

I’m getting loads of bass on the thing…? However, I can see how the Decay might affect the perceived low end if much of the sound’s bass presence is in the sample’s decay segment (like, say, a sample of an 808 kick with a long decay). The same thing can happen when you make a kick drum from a self-oscillating filter. Shorter amp decays might not let the “oomph” of the sound play out.

Having said that, I just ran a single-cycle waveform through the Model:Samples’ filter, cranked up the Resonance and used the LFO as an envelope to smack the filter frequency. Depending on the single-cycle wave I was using, I got window-rattling low end. It wasn’t particularly tight, but it was seriously booming.


#10

No problems with bass here. I just took a single cycle pulse, dropped it a couple octaves, dropped the filter down, and it’s just lovely.