Your Classics in terms of construction (arrangement)?

Hello Nauts !

I’m wondering what are your references tracks in terms of construction (arrangement) - it can be a track with 2 or 3 sections with different (maybe opposite) emotions felt … it can a memorable Bridge and something you would never think to make…

Something special for you… on this subject
Something worth to analyze for the others :wink:

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Something like this is a role model for how I tend (to try) to arrange many tracks.

This is a reference that is far from what I can do, and just leaves me stunned. How many parts and ideas can you put in a single track? Here might be the answer.

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I love this arrangement, builds nice and teases with some delights that don’t stay in for long enough to keep me interested and rewinding to listen again :slight_smile:

http://youtu.be/UjfycO1Sy2A

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that‘s a good trick :slightly_smiling_face:

off topic, but I am wondering if the ongoing acid type line that starts after 7 seconds is a fm synth… Any idea?

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Yes most likely a DX-100 I reckon, but that’s just a guess really.

I used to have a similar approach in my braindance craze. Glad to hear Richard talk about his Bogdan inspiration recently. His tracks are packed with “movements,” and I tried to mimic that point exactly. I think it just left a lot of people worried and confused :joy:

I guess I now try to think of rhythmic and harmonic cohesion (also known as the groove) for jazz and soul inspired house. Kerri Chandler, Moodymann, 95 North, Rick Wade, Theo Parrish, and so much more.

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I don’t usually think about individual tracks when I’m fleshing a song out, but definitely draw inspiration from particular albums. The Avalanches - Since I Left You continually amazes me in its construction and depth. For loop based music the depth and variety in the tracks and across the whole album is hard to beat. Same goes for the more psychedelic Beatles albums. They’re use of the studio as an instrument (plus their awesome songwriting skills) is pretty awe inspiring. Also minimal techno stuff like Claro Intelecto - Peace of Mind really amazes me on its simplicity of elements that remain captivating over the course of the song.

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One of my faves, arrangement wise it’s wonderful.

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It changes depending on the song in working on… A lot of inspiration comes from Phil Spector and Dave Friedmann–The Flaming Lips’ sound design and arrangement had been mind boggling as of late.

If I want inspired strings:

It’s unfair how beautiful those string parts are. Completely out of this world. The man doesn’t get enough credit for that aspect of his music.

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Of course one thing that is somewhat relevant to this thread and Elektron machines (well those with arranger/song mode anyway) is the number of patterns available and trig conditions do facilitate the possibility for interesting arrangements.

I’d be the first to admit though that I don’t really exploit this, I’m mainly a 1 or 2 pattern per jam kind of guy, partly because I like to build “on the fly” and partly due to laziness, but I’m definitely going to explore this more going forward.

The ease with which patterns can be copied and edited then strung together definitely deserves my putting some effort in to, I probably still work on the fly too, but sometimes it will be nice to use the arranger more.

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This Carl Craig remix from Theo Parrish (falling up is one of my reference for sure… These 3 parts are so different in terms of emotional felt… sure he have a lot in the original free jazz from Theo Parrish but Carl Craig really make something with it.

More old gems are Dj Pierre who makes incredible Tracks and usually Ten minutes or so (Raving Lunatics is 16 minutes) it’s to me incredible because not annoying at all (subject to taste for sure) But his Cmon Baby with this RnB Break in the middle of the song was crazy on the dance floor to me. Always remember that one for sure.

Andreas Saag “Release the Groove” was something too…

I think Quincy Jones is a reference too in that territory, clearly.
Prince kill also. (underrated artist to me…)

Carl Craig Falling up

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AG-h27tajtg

Dj Pierre Cmon baby

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLZDUTMUO0Q

Andreas Saag "Release the Groove

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjmWhqvqMM4

MJ "PYT"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZZQuj6htF4

The crazy Batdance from Prince

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ulOLYnOthIw

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DJ Pierre 12 minutes no arrangement to speak of :wink: But damn, still amazing.

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Ravel’s Bolero ! :grin:

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This is the song that roped me into Newman while in college. His arrangements are incredible (and must be in his bloodline). I was fortunate enough to meet him a few years ago. The only thing I could think to say to him was along the lines of just how incredible that first album was and how great of a job he, Lenny Waronker, and Van Dyke Parks did arranging and mixing that album (VDP did the mono mix I believe, which I much prefer to to the stereo).

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:thup:
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I have a great fondness of the arrangements of 80’s club remixes, like for example this Larry Levan remix, plus tons more like Shep Pettibone, Mantronix, Trevor Horn etc and lots of others which I have forgotten, but I really like the “trickery” craftsmanship, drum breakdowns, wild fx, panning, tight edits and so on which are used in many remixes back in the day. Quite incredible considering the technology and often puts modern stuff to shame, maybe computers make people lazy or maybe there are other reasons, but specifically 80s remixes to my ear have yet to be surpassed.

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Van Dyke Parks–there’s a fucking talent. Song Cycle was a big influence on me and my friend for our most recent record.

Just the 60s in general have some incredible music… So much of it crammed into such a short period and a lot of it so mainstream, too. A song like good vibrations would never be on the radio now.

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The one track I’ve never been tired of
so much going on

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