Which monitors do you use?

I use a pair of Adam A7x’s with the Adam Sub7 Pro - I find that most things translate well and the clarity in the ribbon tweeter really helps me pinpoint problem frequiencies.

The sub is kind of overkill for my room (small, almost square) but I got it for a good price on Ebay - I only really use it when tracks are nearly finished, I don’t think my neighbours could handle a few hours of eqing kick drums through it every night :wink:

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A pair of Genelec 6010 plus their 5040 subwoofer. One of the 6010’s recently started hissing even with no input signal; Genelec fixed it under warranty. I sent it to them on Monday and had it back Friday of the same week.

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Genelec 6010 here, too. Very happy with them…

Adanm A7X’s with no sub.
The Room is only 10x12 and people who have heard them in here always think i have a sub when I don’t.
For this sized room they are a superb choice - no complaints and mixes translate really well for my needs.
That said I use ISO acoustic stands with them and they make / made a huge difference along with a set of 4 good sized acoustic panels and rubberized matt on the floor.

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CMS65s, no issues, just goodness.

A7s with Sub8 - no complaints once the Sub level etc is set up properly.

I have a pair of JBL LSR 2325s. These were the most transparent monitors I could find for the money.

I’ve recently purchased a pair of ISO Acoustic stands, and the stands made a huge difference. Most of the sounds (bass included) are much closer to the focal point I want. I especially noticed the difference in the clarity of the reverb & delay effects. I’m very happy with this setup.

Cheers:)

Event Opals and HR824’s.

Yamaha HS80m on stands at head height, in an equilateral triangle to where I work, 1m between centres, away from wall and corners, very happy with them, in the past I had used ‘nice’ sounding monitors and was never really happy, also tried a few subs before but ended up with bass light mixes, the Yamaha’s have a decent enough bass response for the small room (100sq foot) I am in. I also have some Auratones 5c which are great, in the past I liked Dynaudio BM5s too.

Edit - I also only listen at moderate volume, about 85db or less mostly.

I’ve got a pair of HS80Ms as well paired with the HS10W, and it definitely hums (the sub). Tried swapping it out too, and confirmed that it just has a leaky transformer in it. Bummer. Wish I’d’ve known that before getting the sub but was kind of impulsive when I was building my studio out last year. Honestly it isn’t really audible more than a couple meters away, and definitely adds a good amount of low end (not like the 80s really need it, they have plenty on their own, but it is a nice to have).

No treatment in the room but wife is not opposed… my real problem is everything is in a 3rd floor attic with steeply sloped ceiling (speakers are right next to them, so imagine a 45 degree angle wall going right next to the upper left corner of the left speaker). Not sure if any treatment would fix that, may look into it if I get more serious about this mixing bizness. (more into this for the sound design / chillaxing aspect of it all).

I Use KRK rokit RP 10-3 for being able to praise the soundsource in the KRK.
They’re also great if you’re into neighbour hate and such.
I think I’m not.

I use my old Tannoy Reveal Active, and they sounds good enough for me. They are rather cheap and works really well. :slight_smile:

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Another happy HS80M owner here. Bought them a couple years ago after reading lots of good reviews on EU and other forums. The selling point for me: Several pros mentioned that, because of their flat response, they were the best choice for mixing for under $1500 (and they cost me about half that).

A sound engineer buddy of mine is just now helping me orient them w/r/t the walls and baffle the room. I’d done some of this myself but they’re sounding even better with his adjustments. The lesson I’m taking from all this is, you can likely get good results with merely OK monitors if you take care of the rest of the environment properly.

Absolutely!!! We used to have a fully floating Control Room built around Bolt’s graph. We had 3 different brands of monitors on a switcher & I have to say that the acoustics definitely played a bigger part on the success of the final mix than the choice of speaker.
The most impressive aspect was how well mixes translated between a car, home & club systems!
How I wish I’d built it at home rather than in a commercial property, ah well :frowning:

So you are pleased with them… most of the reviews I have read have been positive and someone is selling a pair for $600 few months old with warranty still left… My current passive monitors are 15yrs old and I am thinking they are nearing their end of life and time to get new ones…

Agreed on the room having more to do with the sound than the monitors.

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JBL LSR4328 - I like it

Just bought some Yammy HS80M’s for $550 used that were about 3 months old to replace my 15yr old passive Yorkville monitors… So far in my tunes sound better… Still need to get use to them and bought them based on the good reviews…

NS10 for example a.k.a. Reference Monitors, are loudspeakers for Mixing and/or Mastering exclusively. However are no good for critical listening. These are fundamentally different in a pro-audio environment like a studio. The analogy is IEM are to PA’s. Furthermore, you can’t plug your guitar through reference monitors either, they don’t translate. Neither do line-level devices, they really do need amplifiers. So loudspeakers aren’t loudspeakers and should be applied in the right situation.[/quote]
Some fair points made there Jon!
Actually mine are NS10M therefore ill be able to leave the tissue paper in the bathroom! Lol
Where NS10’s thrive is in the time domain & also in their ability to really show off mid range issues that are not so apparent on other monitors!

The Newells/Holland paper makes interesting reading. It was based on acoustic measurements of 38 different nearfield monitors, carried out in the UK’s premier research anechoic chamber at Southampton University. The acoustic measurements taken included frequency response, harmonic distortion and time-domain response (how quickly a monitor starts and stops in response to an input). At the end of the exercise it’s no exaggeration to say that one monitor stood out like the proverbial sore cliché: the NS10. While its frequency response wasn’t particularly flat, and its low-frequency bandwidth was restricted in comparison to many others, in terms of time-domain and distortion performance it was outstanding.

Monitoring anything under 100Hz is a joke however so having a separate sub or a spectrum analyser is essential.

The NS10 story is quite fascinating,
[font=.HelveticaNeueUI]http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/sep08/articles/yamahans10.htm

[font=.HelveticaNeueUI]Cheers all :slight_smile:

NS10 for example a.k.a. Reference Monitors, are loudspeakers for Mixing and/or Mastering exclusively. However are no good for critical listening. These are fundamentally different in a pro-audio environment like a studio. The analogy is IEM are to PA’s. Furthermore, you can’t plug your guitar through reference monitors either, they don’t translate. Neither do line-level devices, they really do need amplifiers. So loudspeakers aren’t loudspeakers and should be applied in the right situation.[/quote]
Some fair points made there Jon!
Actually mine are NS10M therefore ill be able to leave the tissue paper in the bathroom! Lol
Where NS10’s thrive is in the time domain & also in their ability to really show off mid range issues that are not so apparent on other monitors!

The Newells/Holland paper makes interesting reading. It was based on acoustic measurements of 38 different nearfield monitors, carried out in the UK’s premier research anechoic chamber at Southampton University. The acoustic measurements taken included frequency response, harmonic distortion and time-domain response (how quickly a monitor starts and stops in response to an input). At the end of the exercise it’s no exaggeration to say that one monitor stood out like the proverbial sore cliché: the NS10. While its frequency response wasn’t particularly flat, and its low-frequency bandwidth was restricted in comparison to many others, in terms of time-domain and distortion performance it was outstanding.

Monitoring anything under 100Hz is a joke however so having a separate sub or a spectrum analyser is essential.

The NS10 story is quite fascinating,
[font=.HelveticaNeueUI]http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/sep08/articles/yamahans10.htm

[font=.HelveticaNeueUI]Cheers all :-)[/quote]
Hey Wolf, the NS10’s were only picked out as an example, could have been any near/mid field loud speaker. You’re right though, there aren’t many pro-audio studio’s that don’t have a set somewhere.