Where to buy in depth tutorials of elektron machines?


#1

where can i buy in depth tutorials of elektron machines?
like AR or Akeys, youtube 's poor with vids and i like to learn more A noob to B master of these machines and explain the machines very well and how they work with overbridge in your daw + tricks, info.


#2

You should check out Cuckoomusic’s videos. He did 2 hour-long tutorials for the Rytm:


And one for the AK’s sequencer which also went into sound design:

These are the best tutorials on the net for Elektron machines, IMO.


#3

i know the cuckoo versions, but prefer a more professional learning style.
(not that he’s doing bad work!)
like a more step by step process, start by how to connect setup’s
how to load and save your sounds,
how to create your own sounds, banks,…
how you load new samples to the unit, i’ve seen that for mac there was some app developed to easy import samples.
but 'm on windows, don’t know if something’s there for win10 to…?

'm totally new to drumcomputers or synth’s… and completly lost.

why groove3, sonicacademy, or other tutorial provider… still not jump on this elektron stuff…

think off selling Akeys & AR again, as i’ve got nuts of this things without good resources of how it all works.


#4

I think the best you can do is to first read the whole manual, and while you are reading it start doing stuff with the machines themselves. Elektron’s machines have a learning curve, so don’t get frustrated about it. Yeah, there’s a lack of “from beginner to pro” tutorials about elektron, but once you have the basics after taking a first look at the manuals, then you can look for more concrete stuff you want to do. And about that there are much more videos, at least for A4/Keys (I haven’t found yet a big amount of AR “educative” videos in youtube appart from people jamming).

About the AKeys I don’t know if the problem is that you want to create X sound and you don’t know how (this is more a synthesis knowledge) or you know how to create sounds but you get lost diving menus. If it’s this last case (easier to fix), it’s again all about reading the manual while you are diving into the machine, and start doing simple stuff to then try to acomplish more complex stuff.

So the only answer is: get into it. If you want “fast results”, these machines aren’t for you, and you should think about selling them. But if you want “great results, after having spent some time learning them”, then these machines are for you.


#5

My in depth Tutorial for the Analog four is called synthorial.
My indepth tutorial for rytm is called electronauts
Search for kick, snare, hihat, performance or scene…


#6

i think this is what you’re after : http://www.analoguehaven.com/elektron/analogrytm/manual.pdf


#7

Is Synthorial really a good tool to improve synthesys?


#8

I think it is a little too boring but it helped me a lot


#9

I did the elektron manual and the synthesizer cookbook volume 1. Once you go through those two oscillator recipes they can take you pretty far with any synth.


#10

If you aren’t against using a computer, I found that overbridge was a really helpful learning tool for mastering the Rytm. Once I saw everything laid out on one screen I was like “okay, this is what I have to work with.” A vst workspace was, for me, a really familiar format that I could then transpose to the machine itself.

I recommend that you stick with it. I sold an octatrack once out of frustration, but I’ve since rebought it and I can’t wait to come home and play with it every day.


#11

I find reverse engineering nice also. You listening all factory sounds and wrote the one you like if analog four don’t forget to plug a real keyboard as velocity and modwheel affect a lot the life of the sound.

Wrote the one you like drop the sysex of the program you like, empty you machine, fill with only things you like and start to learning how they create this sounds you like. Start by cut all the FX. Find modulations and undo them one by one you need to take few notes of what happenning when to switch on off things on the sound… then How filters and Envelopes shape the OSC and then How OSC is configured as a starting material to achieve the sound you like at the END…

I think it’s a good technique too for mastering the machine as well as synthesis because what the machine propose affecting the sound you will be able to achieve… on A4 at first i say shit i can’t do a Sine Sub Bass simply i have no sinewave and it’s frustrating me a lot then someone tell me hey you have EQ (yes you right) someone other hey filtered triangle is a sinewave in some points (not exactly the same but yeah pleasing material for a sub) then someone told me i really need to understand the filters (multiple on the A4) plus feedback and FM and yes i could some interesting bass now (at least some bass i like at my taste)

BUT to really mastering the machine you really have to understand Music Creation in the WHOLE process so it’s not just synthesis it’s synthesis + rhythm + harmony + melody + arranging + perform

So i think that’s really extra tutorial you can watch, which is not relative to Elektron machine to BE A MASTER of the MACHINE you need to be a master in all of this PARTS : synthesis + rhythm + harmony + melody + arranging + perform

AND for now i think No one will cover all in a tutorial because he will probably only scratch the surface in a 10hours tutorial and all people probably switch off at 2hours of watching… So it’s probably better to cut things in small pieces, take notes, and experiment.

Organize their machine also in the music goal of their own, where do you go with this machine, where do you go in the music, what do you want to do in a way before to SETUP all

It takes a lot of time and probably a lot of people will not using this strategy and prefer learning slowly and making a lot of “some ok song” and progress in time…

De Wouzer recommend Synthorial and he’s right it’s a very original way of learning by hears. BUT i find it very hard at some point where you have more and more to manage small amount of errors especially in the delay and reverb pourcentage pan also is making me crazy… i have something very close at my hears let’s say to me the same and 5% / 10% of error margin and it’s not passed the lesson ! of course you can hacked it and going to the next. BUT for the whole beginning to middle i find it very nice.

BUT in the synthesis territory a lot of things happening in the experiment and modulation stage so you really have to EXPERIMENT. A lot of people was in a hurry (me too) and that’s not helping very not… crossfingers to be passionated again when you had mastered things ! because finally taking Pleasure in making MUSIC is the KEY.


#12

Btw it’s not an in-depth tutorial of the whole machine (it would take various videos to cover it) but a great tutorial to learn tricks and stuff you’d never think you could do with AR:


#13

Not for free (and maybe a bit late) but I guess this is what the OP wanted: https://www.macprovideo.com/tutorial/elektron-101-overbridge-rytm

Might help others in their search.


#14

do you think it would be helpful for PC people too?


#15

Overbridge is the same on Windows and iOS so yes, it can be handy to get you started.

When on Windows, just keep an eye on the setting “Driver Performance Mode” in de Overbridge control panel. When set to high it seems like audio is coming in to Overbrige but not sending it to the actual plugin. Only issue I had at start.


#17

Channel Dataline (I mean channel his thoughts, telepathically).


#18

Sorry to bring up this old thread, but for german people there is also this quite good tutorial series by recording.de

https://recording.de/magazin/elektron-analog-rytm-workflow-videos-auf-deutsch.3865/

Very basic, but good for beginners.


#19

Germans only teach basic stuff and they are not even good in that :smiley: Because they sometimes dont even know what they are talking about (like its the case in this Recording.de Stuff - i mean: do you know what Parameter-After-Locks should be? for example? embarassing! ) Yeah, so I know it, because i am from Germany and never found any good tutorials for anything in my country! Thats one reason why i started creating tutorials on my channel - in english :wink:

For germans i would recommend: Learn english ! Period! The good tutorials always come from other countries, thats just a (sad) matter of fact.


#20

I bought the Macprovideo Analog Four tutorial when I first got the A4. The video was very helpful.


#21

I found all the macprovideo Elektron tutorials helpful. I’m a fan of Thavius Beck as a teacher.