What is the Best Musical Advice You've Ever Gotten?

Not advice I was given but take to heart anyway. The famous quote attributed to Luther Perkins when he was asked why he didn’t play more ‘fancy’ (more notes):

Well, whatever you’re lookin’ for, I’ve already found.

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I think it was in german though :man_facepalming:

Seems like my mum gave you the same advice than me :wink:
TBH i can’t agree 100%, it depends on situations, if you ever have choice/opportunity to focus on music you shall reach better you goals. I felt so free and much more successful when i chose to focus only on music. Fear of lacking is not a good advisor in my case :wink:

I don’t even know how people do without limitations. With just an OT it’s so many possibilities so whenever i see people (tbh everybody on this forum) with so much hardware around them i feel pain :wink:

Less is more indeed. Same for mixing, cut frequencies instead of boosting on other tracks. It also rejoins the quotes about silence. Probably music without silence would be closer to noise harrasment.

I’m blessed to not give a single f**k about making mistake on stage (unless massive one). Usually my straight up face disturbs quite a lot the friends when in an instrumental band (« he fucked it up… uh no? But i thought that… hmmmpf i just fucked it up now! »)

On a general note i’d say: don’t excuse/pamper yourself for being on stage. Music/good vibe first.

Edit: i forgot the sound engineer quote when recording: « shit in, shit out ». Don’t overtrust postproduction, you’ll earn a lot in terms of time, mental health and natural sound. I guess in terms of electronic production it would match to the quality of samples/sound design you feed your machines with.

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Agreed.

This isn’t the same thing, but it reminds me of once at a gig talking to the DJ (because I did like what he was playing) and he said something like “yeah, I don’t listen to music with lyrics because I don’t want anyone telling me what to feel”. I really didn’t know what to say.

For the same reasons some Islamic fundamentalists forbid music cause it is interfering in your emotions, making your feelings altered by something coming from human intervention and not from divine.

I guess if you don’t want to be told/changed your feelings, you’d better retreat in a cave far away from any cultural thing/human interaction.
Still i have some issues with the moralizing lyrics of some music (i.e. reggae sometimes).

Change it to ‘only listen to the right people’ and you’d have something.

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I think that the sentence I was told that really impacted me most was my brother telling me “I would have never thought you could produce such low level crap”.
It was the very first thing I had ever recorded by myself, I was rather proud of it, knowing it was badly recorded but full of the emotions I could put into music at that time… It devastated me, and it took me a decade to overcome the feeling that I should only produce gold.

Now I just don’t care at all when people don’t like my music, and only grab in people advices the ones I can use, the ones that ring as truth to my ears :slight_smile:

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Do not try to make a perfect piece, just focus on writing many ordinary pieces.

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This the way of ALL religious fundamentalists :wink:

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Stop you are a musician for me and I have a classical training. There are no rules, just convention on music harmony to improvise more easily with others. Rules are here to be transgress in anything really.

If this sounds good to you then you should shout out loud that sounds good and be your first support. everyone find its own audience it’s all matter of emotions and soul connections.

  • Sometimes we need coaching, psychology and self confidence. only that, is a very good start.
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And I was for so long bent out of shape that people close to me weren’t into my music…who aren’t into that music anyway. It’s not like they were going to go turn on Autechre to clean out their ears of my music. So silly. And so I started looking for like-minded people and their opinions and that helped a great deal. From “I mean I don’t get it but good job” to “I love how you inversed the envelopes responses on those two sounds; sick bro”

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Yes otherwise you’ll never drop a track. Discography can get better with time. There’s no shame in that.

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I just turned 37, and it wasn’t until 5 or 6 years ago I got serious about wearing earplugs to band practice/playing shows/attending shows.

I WISH someone had convinced me when I started playing music at 10 that protecting your hearing was cool. The advice I give these days - usually unsolicited - is:

Protect your ears, protect your gears

I also wish I had been taking better care of my amps and effects pedals over the years of gigging and touring.

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Pretty much everyone I know personally either doesn’t really know that I make music or thinks what I make is a pile of crap.

That’s why I don’t seek out their opinions (though some still feel the need to voice one, annoyingly) and mainly why I spend so much time on here.

It does suck though when people you otherwise might respect feel the need to belittle something you put your heart into.

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8 Bars /16 Bars mean that i shoul get faster to the point? When doing Techno tracks?

Nope, in catholicism only halftones gaps were forbidden.
Sufis use music to reach God, hindouism the most fundamentalist is fond of music, etc.

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Just a decade of self doubt is a low price for being confident :sweat_smile:

Born and raised in France i guess?

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Best piece of advice i’ve ever received is so basic on the surface it makes me feel a bit sick.

It’s basically “Except that your track your making won’t sound as slick as the mastered ones you’ve been listening to, and the most important hump to get over is to actually compleate something and not live in a world filled with just perfect 4 bar loops that don’t progress”.

Also, quitting being a daily pot head work wonders for finishing tracks

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My father taught me music originally, and he’s passed along a lot of good advice. I think the best advice is that if you like a song, learn how to play it. If it’s a challenge, good, you’re learning something.

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Reminds me the « no beer near the gear »

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Set limitations and work within self imposed parameters. For example, learn one instrument and explore it’s boundaries to the max before moving on to something else. Avoid collecting gear to reduce distractions.

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