Coffee


#41

I am very addicted, if I miss my morning coffee; headaches grumpiness etc. Thank goodness I luv it. Favourite is my ol trusty Starbucks barista, thing is a beast. Use it daily and still going strong. I’ve got it down to art to for maximum crema. Beans? Pretty much anything ground fresh works pretty great.


#42

I could never drink any of that foreign tea, only Yorkshire tea. Still surprised at how British soil can gives us a tea that can compete with the best of what the colonies have to offer.


#43

Hahaha I’m picturing you wearing khaki shirts, shirt, and a pith hat, whilst reading that.


#44

I actually can’t even drink tea, it gives me a very bad stomach-ache. Only mint, peppermint or lemon and ginger for me.
Or coffee.

I’m afraid of typing this in public in this time of brexit.


#45

I am about to sharpen my pitchfork and come to yours for a visit! Peppermint tea??? My Mrs used to drink that a lot during her pregnancy, as a way to relieve trapped wind!


#46

Ginger, Laurel, Avocado, Eucalyptus, Mint, Rosemary, Thyme, Guava, Fennel, Hibiscus


#47

2 double shot espresso a day of the freshest roast i can find. Heres my cheap little set up.


Then a bottle of wine at night to calm down.:rofl:


#48

Quality coffee tastes great black and requires no milk.


#49

I’m hopelessly addicted to coffee, get serious withdrawal symptoms if I don’t have it daily. Usually wind up drinking around 16-24oz a day.
I have a really amazing Jura machine, makes the best coffee I’ve ever had from a machine, uses whole beans and grinds them per cup.

My favorite beans are Artis and Blue Bottle


#50

Breville owner here. Espresso machine + Grinder combo. Was considering it for the longest time given its price tag and my lack of espresso training and my preference for French press. Then pulled the trigger. Easily the best thing I bought in a while. Use it every single day. I’m by no means an expert, but you will realize how easy it is to make a cappuccino better than most coffeeshops. It’s amazing.


#51

Pot Brew all the way to Turkish coffee. If there is a way to Brew it, I’ve tried it. You should see my cupboard…


#52

Well show us!!


#53

I’m working now but if I remember to post I will


#54

Some weeks ago I enjoyed a kind of coffee-clinic and learned much about beans, how beans are roasted, and how to prepare coffee.

BTW I like Espresso and drinks based on Espresso the most.

There are two general beans, which are Arabica and more important for Espresso Robusta. Many blends are made from Arabica, but the best blends for Espresso have Robusta too.

Very important is the kind of roasting. Most factories try to make as much output per time as possible, but little private companies allow much lower temperatures and much more time for roasting, and this makes a huge difference.

It is also important, how the beans are treated before the roasting … but that’s an other story.

There are definitely differences in quality and aroma, which are caused by the altitude and soil of the region where the plants are growing, but I find it much more important that the people are payed fair. That’s not common in this business.


#55

Yea you’re right. The organic Peruvian beans I’ve been getting are arbitrarily more expensive but that’s because they’re Fair Trade. It’s only a slight increase but can make a big difference to others.


#56


Morning! Some scrabby, Tim Horton’s beans (didn’t even know that there was such a thing.)

Worked ok, but all the talk above has made me want to look into beans more. Cheers!


#57

Excellent! All this talk has made me want to save for a home espresso machine, I usually just go to a local shop.

I’m going to get some fresh roasted Ethiopian today from a new local roaster… Will be my first fresh Ethiopian ever, I hope I get some peach or blueberry notes!

Followed by Tex-Mex for Cinco de Mayo foodstuffs before the gym and museum. Gonna be a nice day if it doesn’t downpour like yesterday.


#58

I’m a bit surprised no one has really got into this yet but I was amazed at the difference a quality grinder makes to a good brew. About 2 years ago I invested in a good burr grinder after reading someone’s claim that it was the biggest difference maker in a good cup regardless of brewing technique of choice.

I was skeptical but then I happened across a good deal on a $200 grinder that was on sale for $80 so I decided to grab it since I needed a new grinder anyways. What a difference!

Honestly, if one is looking on where to get their biggest bang for buck improvement on a brew this is where you should invest your money. I dare say a quality grinder can elevate even the lamest of beans as being able to dial in the appropriate grind for whatever chosen technique is paramount.

Also a consistent grind size, which is impossible with a budget grinder, is very important.


#59

Yes, I’ll take a large hot black. Thanks!


#60

It was the second sentence in my post and what essentially inspired this thread :nerd_face:

I wholeheartedly agree. After researching online the Commandante C40 had the best grind consistency of any grinder, hand or electric, up to the EK43 which costs $2,700… For my home purposes, $250 for a nitro steel burr grinder that will last years on end, if not my entire lifetime, is but a small price for the best coffee I’ve ever had.

  1. Grinder/grind consistency
  2. Technique
  3. Freshness of beans

That’s the order of importance I personally see for great coffee.

@Kegeratorz … That’s what she said!